Mass migration of stingrays

Some beautiful pictures of mass – migrating stingrays here

Why Evolution Is True

The redoubtable Matthew Cobb has called my attention to several posts on a phenomenon that’s new to me: a mass annual migration of stingrays—in this case the cownose ray Rhinoptera bonasus, found in the Atlantic and Caribbean.  This species forages in groups, largely on clams and oysters. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History, their migrations also involve huge populations.

This pelagic species is also sometimes found in inshore waters. For the most part, this species is known for its migrations to different parts of the ocean (oceanodromous). The environments in which they are found include brackish and marine habitats. They are found at depths to 72 feet (22 m). They are gregarious and make long migrations. The cownose ray population is believed to be increasing in numbers. The migration patterns, in the Atlantic, include a northward movement in the late spring and southward movements in…

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Gene therapy: finally a viable option

Most genetic diseases are the result of a mutation that means a particular protein is made incorrectly, or not made at all. The idea of gene therapy is to infect cells – just how a virus would – with a small amount of DNA containing a replacement copy of the affected gene which slips into the cell’s genome and starts making the missing protein. The principle is elegant, but many challenges stand between the theory and successful use of gene therapy with real patients. In the last few years a number of advances have been made that have the potential to make gene therapy – something the medical community almost gave up on a decade ago – a powerful tool which could treat or even cure tons of diseases. What could be cooler than using the very tools viruses like HIV have painstakingly evolved to infect us with for our own benefit?

Genes are strings of bases within your DNA that contain the code to make different proteins. If a mutation occurs in the gene and changes the sequence of letters, it can change which protein subunits the cell uses to make the protein. This creates a mutant protein which may not function corrrectly, ot may stop the protein being created at all

That’s right: I made a GIF: Genes are strings of bases within your DNA that contain the code to make different proteins. If a mutation occurs in the gene and changes the sequence of letters, it can change which protein subunits the cell uses to make the protein. This creates a mutant protein which may not function corrrectly, ot may stop the protein being created at all

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